What goes with what

How to try a new fit

How to try a new fit

At Thread, we've not got much time for those trends that disappear as soon as they've arrived. But we also understand that great style is never static. Even the most classic looks shift subtly, looser or slimmer, as tastes change. Which is why fit is so powerful – you can wear all the same clothes from one year to the next, but an adjustment in your silhouette can make them feel fresh and distinctive. If you're ready for a change, here's how to introduce something new to your wardrobe, without changing your look completely.

Go one degree up or down

When you're trying something new, dip a toe before plunging in. "I'm you already wear slim jeans, you can go to skinny," says Thread stylist Shaunie Brett. "But don't jump there from straight legs." Gradual shifts will feel more comfortable – literally and figuratively – so you'll get a better sense of whether you're actually into the new shape.

Think about the rest of your wardrobe

The best outfits are about balance. Radical shifts in silhouette can throw yours off. "If everything you own is quite slim, then wearing something like a really loose blazer can be too big a juxtaposition," says Shaunie. "Look for a small element of difference – slim jeans with a tailored blazer or wide trousers with a jacket that's boxy, but neat."

Stick to brands you know

There's a big difference between 'size' and 'fit'. "With trousers, even in different fits the waist and hips should be the same," says Shaunie. That's especially true when both pairs are by the same brand, so it lets you compare more accurately. "You can tell what's changed and make a better call on whether it's right for you."

Move around before deciding

If you're used to a particular fit, anything new can feel alien. So don't reject anything just because it's new. "Lift you arms up in jackets and sit down in trousers," says Shaunie. If you feel too restricted, then it's probably the wrong size – as well as the wrong fit.

Pick the right pieces

The easiest place to experiment with fit is outerwear. "There's more leeway," says Shaunie. "There's less connotation with trends or subcultures so going for something loose or tight is more forgiving." Chinos are also a good testing ground. "Jeans can be tricky to get right, but chinos have a touch more wiggle room."