Clothes for specific weather

Four ways to make your summer style more daring

Four ways to make your summer style more daring

Summer dressing tends to fall into two camps – wearing the same clothes you do for the rest of the year, but with shorts, or embracing loud and proud prints you wouldn’t give a second glance in autumn. But there is a middle way, which strikes a balance between stuff that’s safe and dressing like you’re off to a rave.

“It’s a little too easy to default to block colours,” says Thread stylist Freddie Kemp. “They’re popular for a reason, but they don’t have to be your entire outfit.” Instead of relying on your warm-weather go-tos, adding a few stand-out pieces to your rotation will make your entire wardrobe feel brand new. “It’s about making little changes that have a big effect. Using colour or pattern sparingly can do more to grab attention than head-to-toe neon.” Deploy these simple tricks and you’ll make your summer style feel more daring, but never reckless.

Let your shoes make a statement

Photographed: Vans Authentic trainers £55A Days March navy overshirt (£119)Sunspel organic cotton t-shirt (£65)MVP Lukin cotton chino shorts (£24)Sun Buddies Cam’ron sunglasses (£115)

Why it works: “It’s a cliche, but it’s also true – shoes are the first thing people notice when checking out your outfit," says Freddie. "If you wear a bolder style, it will get the right kind of attention.”

How to pull it off: “Keep the rest of your outfit fairly neutral, but not completely,” says Freddie. “What really makes this look killer is the softer, colourful t-shirt. It subtly breaks up the neutral tones and complements the shoes brilliantly. They’re still the main attraction, but feel a part of a whole look, rather than an add-on.”

Wide leg trousers you can actually wear

Photographed: Suit ‘Dr Tate’ dust green trousers (£89.95)Sunspel classic Breton stripe t-shirt (£65); Ray-Ban sunglasses (£129)Vans white OG classic slip-on (£59)

Why it works: “Summer is not the time for skinny jeans,” says Freddie. “It’s just too hot and they aren’t breathable. A wider silhouette, especially below the waist, is much more comfortable. It's more stylish than showy.”

How to pull it off: “A lot of runway trends do not translate to the real world, but wide-leg trousers have successfully made the leap because they actually look good on normal guys,” says Freddie. “Stick with a simple t-shirt and trainer combination – you know it well, so it'll feel less of a big change. Balance is important so opt for a t-shirt that's fitted, but not tight. This way you'll look comfortable, relaxed and stylish.”

Pay attention to accessories

Photographed: Norse Projects sports cap (£55)Sun Buddies Cam’ron sunglasses (£115)Ally Capellino rucksack (£195)Paul Smith t-shirt (£100)MVP light wash Cavell jeans (£55); Converse Chuck Taylor 1970s (£75)

Why it works: “Things like bags, sunglasses and hats are low-impact, because they’re easy to remove, but the right kind can still feel like a style refresh,” says Freddie. “Using jeans and a t-shirt as a base allows the accessories to do the talking without completely changing your style.”

How to pull it off: “ Keeping your outfit simple gives you licence to push the boat out a little,” says Freddie. “So don't be afraid to try colours you wouldn't normally think suit you, or are different to what you’re used to.”

Patterns that don’t wear you

Photographed: BoohooMan leaf-print cotton short (£10)MVP pink Ashfield t-shirt (£14); Ray-Ban sunglasses (£129); Converse Chuck Taylor 1970s Ox Vintage (£69)

Why it works: “Pattern immediately adds an element of fun and character that will help you to stand out,” says Freddie. “A thought-out pattern or print takes an outfit to the next level.”

How to pull it off: “I'd say shorts are the best entry point for pattern as, to put it simply, they have the least amount of fabric,” says Freddie. “So the pattern covers less of the body. To really nail it, pick out colours in the pattern and echo them in the rest of your look. For example, the green in these shorts is complemented by the slightly different shade of green in the shoes.”

 

Words: Nadia Balame-Price