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Coats & Jackets

How to look after a blazer

How to look after a blazer

We get that after a long day, you just want to slide out of your work clothes and into a sweatshirt. Which is why your blazer often finds itself hung over a chair, the back of a door or – worst of all – tossed on the floor. But the seconds you save in not heading straight to your wardrobe add up to a jacket that looks tired before its time.

“A blazer should last you years,” says Thread stylist Alexander McCalla. “But it will only stay looking good if you treat it properly. It's an investment and you should give it the care it deserves.” Below, Alexander reveals the tools you need to keep your tailoring in top knick. It’s worth the effort, for your style and your wallet.

The five things you need to look after a blazer

Blazer care tools

Photographed: Reiss herringbone blazer (£285)

Wooden hangers (1)

“A blazer or a suit jacket is designed to sit on your shoulders,” says Alexander. “You need a hanger that’s a similar size, otherwise the fabric and padding gets stretched out of shape.” The wire hangers you get from dry cleaners are the worst offenders – they’ll also ruin knitwear and t-shirts, so throw them out immediately – but the backs of chairs are just as bad. “The best hangers are a quarter-inch thick in the body and an inch thick at the shoulder cap. Have a few at home and at least two at work. Visitors will appreciate the attention to detail.”

Garment bag (2) and suit brush (3)

If your blazer spends more than five days in a row hung up, it should be in a bag. “Otherwise it can collect dust or get pulled and torn by the other things in your wardrobe,” says Alexander. Moths particularly love a dormant blazer – they feast on the skin flakes that get trapped in the seams and lining. “That’s also why you should brush it before you hang it up. It only takes a couple of seconds, but it means you won’t discover holes in the sleeve next time you slip it on.”

Lint roller (4) and steamer (5)

It might say ‘dry clean only’ on your blazer, but it should read ‘dry clean rarely’. “The chemicals destroy the fabric,” says Alexander. “If you wear it a lot, then twice a year is plenty.” Instead, use a lint roller to remove any dust and dirt before it can get into the fabric and use a steamer to keep it pressed. “But never an iron. It damages the material and makes it look shiny.” Then just be careful with your coffee.